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The porcelain figurines, which originated in the middle of the last century and continue to this day, captivate with their modern form.

They represent a unique treat for art collectors who value the beauty and uniqueness of these works. Characterized by simplified forms that encapsulate profound aesthetics in their simplicity, they're enhanced by bold splashes of color, creating an unforgettable impression. This fusion of minimalism with striking accents makes these figurines timeless and a true treasure for collectors.

Among the artists at the Institute of Industrial Design in Warsaw, Lubomir Tomaszewski stands out for his representation of female figures. His "Girl in flares" figurine, designed in 1961, is one of the most iconic examples of Polish design. The young girl, brimming with vitality and confidence, stands firmly with one leg forward. Tomaszewski's projects are distinguished by their excellence in synthesis and fluid lines, reflecting his sculptural background from the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts. He approached porcelain design as he would sculpture, treating each project with full artistic seriousness. The "Girl in flares" showcases his skill and approach to shaping form in a sculptural manner. Even though the girl lacks facial features, she radiates beauty, self-assuredness, and symbolizes modernity. Tomaszewski distilled the essence of the female body, highlighting its most characteristic features. The young porcelain woman has her hair elegantly tied up, cascading down her shoulders. She interlocks her hands behind her, accentuating her chest, while nonchalantly taking a step forward, adorned in colorful wide-legged pants. She symbolizes a modern, self-assured woman.

The designer crafted numerous figurines portraying women, including hippie girls in pants, robust singers, women admiring themselves in mirrors, bathing, and combing their hair. In his characteristic synthetic approach, Tomaszewski was able to capture nationality as well. Figures like "Mexican Woman," "Exotic Woman," and a series of differently colored Arabian figures exemplify this ability. Despite the lack of detail, the viewer has no doubts about the country/profession the artist depicted, emphasized by harmonious decoration complementing the form.

"Sitting girl" is a design by Henryk Jędrasiak from 1958. Alongside the "Girl in flares," it's one of the most popular figurines from Ćmielów. The seated girl leans on one hand, the other rests on her thigh. The designer had a penchant for highlighting the softness and curves of feminine shapes. The latticed and synthetic form reflects the characteristics of the Polish New Look. Fluid lines and soft forms evoke sculptures by Henry Moore. His girls feature narrow waists, small round heads on slim necks, and hair tied in ponytails, accentuating the image of a mid-20th-century contemporary woman.

Here we can recall two more designs by Henryk Jędrasiak that possess these characteristic traits: "Sex Bomb" (1959) and "African girl" (1958).

Among the designs depicting people, women predominated, but a few representations of men were also present, such as "Litte sailor"," "Athlete," "Snake Charmer," and "Mexican Rider."

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Nazwa produktu:
Girl relaxing
Girl relaxing
Girl relaxing
    Price

Brand:

989.00 zł

White and black at its best.

Figurine Relaxation is a great example of changes in the consciousness of the perceiver recipient porcelain figurines as ornamental trinkets to the rank of small works of art perfectly enrolling in a modern interior.

The perfect gift for collectors as well as a perfect business gift.

Nazwa produktu:
Singer (new decorations)
Singer
Singer
    Price

Brand:

989.00 zł

The figurine Arab Girl is a perfect example of a form developed by the designers of the Institute of Industrial Design in Warsaw in the middle of the last century.

Lubomir Tomaszewski once again showed that porcelain figurines are not trinkets but small works of art that still delight.